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Tribes eye program to address missing Native Americans

Jeannie Hovland, the deputy assistant secretary for Native American Affairs for the U.S....
Jeannie Hovland, the deputy assistant secretary for Native American Affairs for the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, poses with a Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women mask, Wednesday, Aug. 26, 2020, in Anchorage, Alaska. She attended the opening of a Lady Justice Task Force cold case office in Anchorage, which will investigate missing and murdered Indigenous women. (AP Photo/Mark Thiessen)(Mark Thiessen | AP)
Published: Dec. 2, 2020 at 9:05 AM AKST
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HELENA, Mont. (AP) - The Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes and the U.S. attorney for Montana launched a pilot project to improve the response to the crisis of missing and murdered Indigenous people.

The pilot is part of a national effort to address the high rates of missing and slain Native Americans. The new project announced Tuesday will establish guidelines in collaboration with tribal governments, law enforcement and other partners.

The tribes will be joined by communities in Alaska, Michigan, Minnesota, Oklahoma and Oregon that will each develop their own response plans tailored to the community’s needs.

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