Anchor Point baby sea otter recovering at the Alaska SeaLife Center

Baby sea otters Juniper and Pushki at the Alaska SeaLife Center.
Baby sea otters Juniper and Pushki at the Alaska SeaLife Center.(Alaska SeaLife Center)
Published: Jan. 8, 2021 at 3:13 PM AKST
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ANCHORAGE, Alaska (KTUU) - Three sea otter pups are now in the care of the Alaska SeaLife Center in Seward.

The most recent arrival was brought to the center after being stranded on an Anchor Point beach. The two-month-old was found near a bald eagle that was scavaging the carcass of an adult otter. Staff at ASLC speculate the adult otter may have been the pup’s mother.

Because she was so close to the feeding eagle and in such bad condition, ASLC got permission from U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service to bring her to the center.

She was covered in dirt and there were signs the pup had been eating plants she found on the beach.

“Sea otters have a very sensitive gastrointestinal tract which can quickly become inflamed leading to a life-threatening situation,” says Veterinarian Dr. Elizabeth deCastro. “In addition to fluids, we gave her medications to combat the inflammation and promote healing.”

Baby sea otter Juniper being cared for at the Alaska SeaLife Center.
Baby sea otter Juniper being cared for at the Alaska SeaLife Center.(Alaska SeaLife Center)

The pup has been stabilized and named Juniper.

She was introduced to Pushki, another pup who was rescued in November.

“The pups were initially curious about one another and vocalized back and forth for quite some time,” says Wildlife Response Curator, Jane Belovarac. “We watched them play, swim, and groom each other, which are all behaviors that we like to see during a sea otter introduction.”

Baby sea otters need round the clock care until they are about six months old according to ASLC.

The third pup, Lupine, being cared for at ASLC, was rescued in July; staff plan on introducing all three soon.

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